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Fatigue clinical trials at UCSD
4 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • A Crossover Study to Compare RAYOS to IR Prednisone to Improve Fatigue and Morning Symptoms for SLE

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    To compare the effect of RAYOS® versus immediate-release (IR) prednisone on fatigue as measured by Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F).

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Armodafinil in Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With High Grade Glioma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase III trial studies armodafinil to see how well it works in reducing cancer-related fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. Armodafinil may help relieve fatigue in patients with high grade glioma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Pelvic Radiation Therapy or Vaginal Implant Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Stage I or Stage II Endometrial Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies pelvic radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with high-risk stage I or stage II endometrial cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Implant radiation therapy uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether pelvic radiation therapy alone is more effective than vaginal implant radiation therapy, paclitaxel, and carboplatin in treating patients with endometrial cancer.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Standard of Care Therapy With or Without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and/or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations