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Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) clinical trials at UCSD
8 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

  • A Study to Compare Safety and Efficacy of Upadacitinib to Dupilumab in Adult Participants With Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This is a phase 3, randomized, multi-center study that will evaluate upadacitinib versus dupilumab in adults (18-75 years of age) with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) who are candidates for systemic therapy. The study is comprised of a 35-day screening period, a 24-week blinded treatment period, and a 12-week follow-up period.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Upadacitinib in Adolescent and Adult Subjects With Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    open to eligible people ages 12-75

    The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of upadacitinib for the treatment of adolescent and adult participants with moderate to severe AD who are candidates for systemic therapy.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Effect of Dupilumab (Anti-IL4Rα) on the Host-Microbe Interface in Atopic Dermatitis

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The purpose of this study is to understand the effect that T helper 2 (Th2) blockade has on well-described pathophysiological features of Atopic Dermatitis (AD), for example: barrier, epidermal activation, dysbiosis and epidermal lipids.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Systemic Therapies for Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis

    open to eligible people ages 2-17

    While many patients with atopic dermatitis (eczema) can be managed with topical creams and treatments for itch, some children have such severe, long-standing disease that they need treatment with oral medications that decrease the ability of the immune system to react. However, there is not enough information on the proper use of these medications or how well they work compared with each other. The current study looks at the response of children treated with these medications to provide this information and improve their use.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Evaluation of the Kinetic Properties of an Autologous Microbiome Transplant in Adult Atopic Dermatitis Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Unlike healthy control skin, the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is frequently colonized by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), putting these patients at increased risk of S. aureus skin infections. In addition, research in the investigator's lab has shown that these patients have fewer protective Staphylococcal species such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) that are known to produce antimicrobial peptides that play a role in protecting the skin from invading pathogens. In this study, the study team will attempt to decrease S. aureus colonization and increase colonization by protective Staph species in AD patients by first culturing the bacteria on subjects' lesional AD skin. The study team will selectively grow the subject's protective Staph colonies and place them into a moisturizer. The first part of the study will determine the half-life of the bacteria-containing moisturizer. The bacteria-containing moisturizer will be applied to a subject's arm, and the subject will return at four different time points over the next three days for skin swabs of the arm that will be used to determine the amount and type of bacteria on the arm at those time points. In the second part of the study, the subject will apply moisturizer containing his own antimicrobial bacteria to one of his arms for a total of 6 times at a frequency determined by the half-life, which will be computed at the end of the first part of this experiment. The subject will return prior to the 7th application time point for skin swabs of the arm to ensure that there are still viable bacteria from the moisturizer present on the arm. In the third part of the study, each subject will receive both moisturizer as well as moisturizer plus his own antimicrobial bacteria. The subject will apply the moisturizer to one arm and the moisturizer plus bacteria to the other arm daily for a total of 15 days. Subjects will return to the clinic every 5 days for skin swabs and clinical evaluations. If the moisturizer containing bacteria is able to decrease the S. aureus colonization on subject's arms, the study team hypothesizes that subjects will have improvement of their AD symptoms.

    San Diego, California

  • Examination of Whether Host Preconditioning Modifies Short-term Transplant Survival

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Unlike healthy control skin, the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is frequently colonized by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), putting these patients at increased risk of S. aureus skin infections. In addition, research in the investigator's lab has shown that these patients have fewer protective antimicrobial Staphylococcal species such as Staphylococcal epidermidis (S. epidermidis) known to produce antimicrobial peptides that play a role in protecting the skin from invading pathogens. In this study, the investigator will attempt to decrease S. aureus colonization and increase colonization by protective Staph species. First the investigator will culture the bacteria on subjects' lesional AD skin. The investigator will selectively grow the subject's antimicrobial Staph colonies and place them into a base moisturizer. The moisturizer plus bacteria will be applied to both of the subject's arms. Prior to applying this, though, one arm will first be pre-treated with an antimicrobial regiment of Dial liquid antibacterial soap and alcohol. We will then compare the abundance of antimicrobial Staph species on each subject's arms 24 hours later to determine whether the pre-treatment regimen increased survival of the transplanted antimicrobial Staph species. The investigator expects that the arm pre-treated with the antimicrobial regimen will have more antimicrobial Staph species at this time point.

    San Diego, California

  • Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of PF-04965842 With or Without Topical Medications in Subjects Aged 12 Years and Older With Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    B7451015 is a Phase 3 study to evaluate PF-04965842 with or without Topical Medications in patients aged 12 years and older with a minimum body weight of 40 kg who have moderate to severe atopic dermatitis and have completed a qualifying Phase 3 study. The efficacy and safety of two dosage strengths of PF-04965842, 100 mg and 200 mg taken orally once daily, will be evaluated over approximately two years of study participation. Patients who meet safety step-down criteria will have their dose reduced once, from 200 mg QD to 100 mg QD, or from 100 mg QD to placebo.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Validation of the Short-term Antimicrobial Action of Transplanted Bacteria

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Unlike healthy control skin, the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is frequently colonized by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), putting these patients at increased risk of S. aureus skin infections. In addition, research in the investigator's lab has shown that these patients have fewer protective antimicrobial Staphylococcal species such as Staphylococcal epidermidis (S. epidermidis) that are known to produce antimicrobial peptides that play a role in protecting the skin from invading pathogens. In this study, the investigator will attempt to decrease S. aureus colonization and increase colonization by protective Staph species in AD patients. First the investigator will capture the bacteria on subjects' lesional AD skin. Next the investigator will selectively grow the subject's antimicrobial Staphylococcal colonies and place them into a base moisturizer. The moisturizer plus bacteria will be applied to one of the subject's arms, and the moisturizer alone (without bacteria) to the other arm. The investigator will then do a quantitative wash of the bacteria growing on each arm one day later in order to determine whether the S. aureus abundance was affected by the application of the transplanted bacteria.

    San Diego, California

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