Skip to main content

Bone Cancer clinical trials at UCSD

5 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Immunotherapy With Nivolumab and Ipilimumab Followed by Nivolumab or Nivolumab With Cabozantinib for Patients With Advanced Kidney Cancer, The PDIGREE Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares the usual treatment (treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab followed by nivolumab alone) to treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab, followed by nivolumab with cabozantinib in patients with untreated renal cell carcinoma that has spread to other parts of the body. The addition of cabozantinib to the usual treatment may make it work better. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known how well the combination of cabozantinib and nivolumab after initial treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab works in treating patients with renal cell cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Study of CRX100 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical study is an open-label, phase 1, dose-escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of CRX100 in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors. Patients will be screened and evaluated to determine whether or not they meet stated inclusion criteria. Enrolled subjects will undergo leukapheresis to enable the ex vivo generation of autologous cytokine induced killer (CIK) cells. Patients with triple-negative breast cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, osteosarcoma, epithelial ovarian cancer, and gastric cancer will be considered.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Testing the Addition of a New Anti-cancer Drug, Radium-223 Dichloride, to the Usual Treatment (Cabozantinib) for Advanced Renal Cell Cancer That Has Spread to the Bone, the RadiCaL Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies whether adding radium-223 dichloride to the usual treatment, cabozantinib, improves outcomes in patients with renal cell cancer that has spread to the bone. Radioactive drugs such as radium-223 dichloride may directly target radiation to cancer cells and minimize harm to normal cells. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving radium-223 dichloride and cabozantinib may help lessen the pain and symptoms from renal cell cancer that has spread to the bone, compared to cabozantinib alone.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Testing the Safety of Different Doses of Olaparib Given Radium-223 for Men With Advanced Prostate Cancer With Bone Metastasis

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the best dose and side effects of olaparib and how well it works with radium Ra 223 dichloride in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to the bone and other places in the body (metastatic). PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Radioactive drugs, such as radium Ra 223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Giving olaparib and radium Ra 223 dichloride may help treat patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Testing Whether Treating Breast Cancer Metastases With Surgery or High-Dose Radiation Improves Survival

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and/or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Bone Cancer research studies include .

Last updated: