Skip to main content

Bone Marrow Transplant clinical trials at UCSD

15 in progress, 6 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Daratumumab Plus Lenalidomide Versus Lenalidomide Alone as Maintenance Treatment in Participants With Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Who Are Minimal Residual Disease Positive After Frontline Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18-79

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate conversion rate to minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity following the addition of daratumumab to lenalidomide relative to lenalidomide alone, when administered as maintenance treatment to anti-cluster of differentiation 38 (CD38) treatment naive participants with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who are MRD positive as determined by next generation sequencing (NGS) at screening, following high-dose therapy (HDT) and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Allogeneic Engineered Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HCT) Lacking the CD33 Protein, and Post-HCT Treatment With Mylotarg, for Patients With CD33+ AML

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This is a Phase 1/2a, multicenter, open-label, first-in-human (FIH) study of VOR33 in participants with AML who are undergoing human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Efficacy of MT-401 in Patients With AML Following Stem Cell Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is a Phase 2 multicenter study with a Safety Lead-in evaluating safety and efficacy of MT-401 administration to patients with AML, who have received their first allogeneic HSCT. The dose administered is 50 x 106 cells (flat dosing).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Safety Study of Human Spinal Cord-derived Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Chronic SCI

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This is a safety study of human spinal cord-derived neural stem cell (HSSC) transplantation for the treatment of chronic spinal cord injury.

    San Diego, California

  • Safety Study of Unlicensed, Investigational Cord Blood Units Manufactured by the NCBP for Unrelated Transplantation

    open to all eligible people

    This study will evaluate the safety of infusion of the investigational cord blood units by carefully documenting all infusion-related problems.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A Study of Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplant for Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    The primary objective is to determine overall survival 180 days after transplantation involving HLA-haploidentical stem cell/bone marrow graft, and post-transplant Cy.

    La Jolla, California

  • Comparing Cyclophosphamide and Abatacept With Standard of Care Treatment Following Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Hematologic Malignancy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the combination of cyclophosphamide and abatacept versus the treatment used in standard of care will reduce the incidence of moderate and severe chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. GVHD occurs when the cells from your donor (the graft) see your body's cells (the host) as different and attack them.

    La Jolla, California

  • Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase III trial studies ibrutinib to see how well it works compared to placebo when given before and after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Patients then receive high doses of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and make room for healthy cells. After treatment, the stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Ibrutinib is a drug that may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein that is needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether adding ibrutinib to chemotherapy before and after stem cell transplant may help the transplant work better in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies lenalidomide to see how well it works compared to a placebo in treating patients with multiple myeloma who are undergoing autologous stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Giving lenalidomide after autologous stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for multiple myeloma.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Randomized Trial of Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, Dexamethasone vs High-Dose Treatment With SCT in MM Patients up to Age 65

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The drugs, lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone, are approved by the FDA. They have not been approved in the combination for multiple myeloma or any other type of cancer. Bortezomib is currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Lenalidomide is approved for use with dexamethasone for patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy and for the treatment of certain types of myelodysplastic syndrome (another type of cancer affecting the blood). Dexamethasone is commonly used, either alone, or in combination with other drugs, to treat multiple myeloma. Please note that Bortezomib and Lenalidomide are provided to patients participating in this trial at no charge. Melphalan and cyclophosphamide, the drugs used during stem cell collection and transplant, are also approved by the FDA. Melphalan is an FDA-approved chemotherapy for multiple myeloma and is used as a high-dose conditioning treatment prior to stem cell transplantation. Cyclophosphamide is used, either alone, or in combination with other drugs, to treat multiple myeloma. These drugs have been used in other multiple myeloma studies and information from those studies suggests that this combination of therapy may help to treat newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. In this research study, we are looking to explore the drug combination, lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone alone or when combined with autologous stem cell transplantation to see what side effects it may have and how well it works for treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Specifically, the objective of this trial is to determine if, in the era of novel drugs, high dose therapy (HDT) is still necessary in the initial management of multiple myeloma in younger patients. In this study, HDT as compared to conventional dose treatment would be considered superior if it significantly prolongs progression-free survival by at least 9 months or more, recognizing that particular subgroups may benefit more compared to others.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Stem Cell Transplantation With NiCord® (Omidubicel) vs Standard UCB in Patients With Leukemia, Lymphoma, and MDS

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is an open-label, controlled, multicenter, international, Phase III, randomized study of transplantation of NiCord® versus transplantation of one or two unmanipulated, unrelated cord blood units in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia or lymphoma, all with required disease features rendering them eligible for allogeneic transplantation.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Tabelecleucel for Solid Organ or Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Participants With Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease (EBV+ PTLD) After Failure of Rituximab or Rituximab and Chemotherapy

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical benefit and characterize the safety profile of tabelecleucel for the treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (EBV+ PTLD) in the setting of (1) solid organ transplant (SOT) after failure of rituximab and rituximab plus chemotherapy or (2) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) after failure of rituximab.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Treosulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen Before a Blood or Bone Marrow Transplant for the Treatment of Bone Marrow Failure Diseases (BMT CTN 1904)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase II trial tests whether treosulfan, fludarabine, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) work when given before a blood or bone marrow transplant (conditioning regimen) to cause fewer complications for patients with bone marrow failure diseases. Chemotherapy drugs, such as treosulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Fludarabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. rATG is used to decrease the body's immune response and may improve bone marrow function and increase blood cell counts. Adding treosulfan to a conditioning regimen with fludarabine and rATG may result in patients having less severe complications after a blood or bone marrow transplant.

    San Diego, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Bone Marrow Transplant research studies include .

Last updated: