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Cannabis clinical trials at UCSD

5 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

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  • Cannabis Effects on Antiretroviral Therapy Pharmacokinetics and Neurotoxicity

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will address whether cannabis affects antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug concentrations, mood, and thinking. The project will have two phases. Phase 1 is an observational study, in which 120 people will be assessed to evaluate the effects of chronic cannabis use on ART drug concentrations, mood, and thinking. In Phase 2, the study will administer cannabis (or placebo) to 40 people to examine its acute effects on ART drug concentrations.

    San Diego, California

  • Effect of Cannabis and Endocannabinoids on HIV Neuropathic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Acute cannabis administration is reported to alleviate HIV neuropathic pain (HIV-NP), but there is limited knowledge about the effects of cannabis constituents (delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol/THC and cannabidiol/CBD), the consequences of long-term cannabis use, and the impact of cannabis on endocannabinoid (EC) function in people living with HIV- NP. Our objective is to address these three fundamental gaps in our knowledge by: 1) examining the acute effects of various CBD/THC products on HIV-NP, 2) utilizing a mHealth text messaging protocol, Individual Monitoring of Pain and Cannabis Taken (IMPACT) to monitor daily real-world cannabis use and changes in pain; and 3) studying the relationship between cannabinoids, EC biomarkers, and chronic neuropathic pain

    San Diego, California

  • Effects of Cannabis on Cognition and Endocannabinoid Levels in Bipolar Disorder Patients and Healthy Volunteers

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    Cannabis use is associated with younger age at onset of bipolar disorder, poor outcome, and more frequent manic episodes, but the effects of cannabis on cognition are less clear. Contrary to reports among non-psychiatric patients, cannabis may improve cognition among people with bipolar disorder. Nevertheless, no study to date has systematically tested the acute effects of cannabis on cognition in bipolar disorder. Therefore, the investigators propose to determine the effects of oral cannabinoid administration on cognitive domains relevant to bipolar disorder, e.g., arousal, decision making, cognitive control, inhibition, and temporal perception (sense of timing). In addition, the investigators will evaluate different doses of the two major components of cannabis, cannabidiol and ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and compare them to placebo on these neurocognitive measures. The investigators will also test the effects of acute exposure to cannabinoids on cerebrospinal levels of anandamide and homovanillic acid - markers of endocannabinoid and dopamine activity in the brain, respectively. These studies will provide information that effectively bridges the fields of addiction and general psychiatry, informing treatment development for co-morbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders.

    San Diego, California

  • Efficacy of Inhaled Cannabis for Acute Migraine Treatment

    open to eligible people ages 21-65

    This crossover study will evaluate 3 different treatments of vaporized cannabis (THC, THC/CBD mix, and CBD) and vaporized placebo cannabis for the acute treatment of migraine.

    La Jolla, California

  • Cannabis Use, Cognition, and the Endocannabinoid System in HIV

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Understanding how co-morbidities in persons with HIV (PWH) such as substance use affect risk-taking, decision-making, and other cognitive behaviors is important given implications for everyday functioning and transmission risk. The high prevalence of cannabis use in PWH, medicinally and recreationally, may indicate disease severity, impart therapeutic benefits, or adverse consequences. In fact, cannabis is recommended to those with HIV to alleviate nausea, improve appetite, relieve pain, and lift mood. To-date, the consequences of cannabis use in PWH remain unclear as do potential interactions with HIV treatments. In healthy participants, heavy cannabis use is associated with cognitive deficits e.g., risky decision-making, response disinhibition and inattention, but pro-cognitive effects in PWH may exist at mild use levels due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxic properties. Furthermore, little has been done to determine the effects of cannabis use on the endocannabinoid (EC) system in general or in PWH. This study will determine the effects of the two primary cannabis constituents (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC], cannabidiol [CBD]) vs. placebo on risky decision-making, response inhibition, reward learning, temporal perception, and motivation, plus EC and homovanillic acid (HVA; a surrogate for dopamine activity) levels in HIV+ and HIV- subjects. Participants with infrequent cannabis use will undergo baseline cognitive testing and biomarker assays with antiretrovirals (ART) use quantified. They will be randomized to a 5-day course of either THC, CBD, or placebo and return for follow-up testing and re-assaying of ECs and HVA levels.

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