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Metabolic Syndrome clinical trials at UCSD
2 in progress, 0 open to new patients

  • The Impact of Time Restricted Feeding (TRF) in Improving the Health of Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators intend to measure the health impact of a dietary intervention known as time restricted feeding (TRF) on patients with metabolic syndrome (three or more of: increased waist circumference, abnormal cholesterol levels, elevated blood pressure, or elevated blood sugar). The investigators will enroll patients with metabolic syndrome who eat for ≥ 14 hours per day and will ask participants to reduce daily oral intake to 10 hours per day. The investigators will assess the impact of this dietary change using measures obtained before and after a 12 week intervention period, including body mass index, blood pressure, various lab parameters and blood sugar levels (assessed using a continuous glucose monitor). The investigators will assess for compliance with TRF using a Smart Phone application (myCircadianClock (mCC) app).

    La Jolla, California

  • Vestibular Stimulation to Trigger Adipose Loss Clinical Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    There is an ongoing and worsening problem with obesity in the developed, and much of the developing world. Although it has long been realized that Western diets that are rich in sugar and fat play an important role in this, it has only recently been realized that exposure to these diets, particularly in childhood, can damage the part of the brain that determines how much fat there is in the body. The result of this damage is that the so-called "set-point" for fat in this part of the brain is pushed upwards. There is a lot of evidence from animals that activating the brain's balance (vestibular) system pushes this set-point for fat downwards to cause fat loss, probably because this tricks the brain into thinking that the animal is more physically active. The aim of this study is to see whether the same effect can be triggered in humans by non-invasively stimulating the vestibular system with a small electrical current through the skin behind their ears.

    San Diego, California

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