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Rectal Cancer clinical trials at UCSD

7 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A2B694, a Logic-gated CAR T, in Subjects With Solid Tumors That Express MSLN and Have Lost HLA-A*02 Expression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to test A2B694, an autologous logic-gated Tmod™ CAR T-cell product in subjects with solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic cancer (PANC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), ovarian cancer (OVCA), mesothelioma (MESO), and other solid tumors that express MSLN and have lost HLA-A*02 expression. The main questions this study aims to answer are: Phase 1: What is the recommended dose of A2B694 that is safe for patients Phase 2: Does the recommended dose of A2B694 kill the solid tumor cells and protect the patient's healthy cells Participants will be required to perform study procedures and assessments, and will also receive the following study treatments: Enrollment and Apheresis in BASECAMP-1 (NCT04981119) Preconditioning Lymphodepletion (PCLD) Regimen A2B694 Tmod CAR T cells at the assigned dose

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and/or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Tucatinib Combined With Trastuzumab and TAS-102 for the Treatment of HER2 Positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Molecularly Selected Patients, 3T Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase II trial studies whether tucatinib combined with trastuzumab and TAS-102 works to shrink tumors in patients with HER2 positive colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) and has one of the following gene mutations detected in blood: PIK3CA, KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF V600. Tucatinib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of the abnormal protein that signals tumor cells to multiply. This helps stop or slow the spread of tumor cells. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. TAS-102 is a combination of 2 drugs; trifluridine and tipiracil. Trifluridine is in a class of medications called thymidine-based nucleoside analogues. It works by stopping the growth of tumor cells. Tipiracil is in a class of medications called thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors. It works by slowing the breakdown of trifluridine by the body. Giving tucatinib, trastuzumab, and TAS-102 together may work better than usual treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Through Multiomics Blood Testing

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The PREEMPT CRC study is a prospective multi-center observational study to validate a blood-based test for the early detection of colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples from average-risk participants who will undergo a routine screening colonoscopy.

    San Diego, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Rectal Cancer research studies include .

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