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Sleep clinical trials at UCSD
3 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • Cerebral MRI During Sleep

    open to eligible people ages 18-59

    Recent studies in animal models have suggested a critical role for cerebrospinal fluid and Interstitial fluid flux through cerebral parenchyma for removal of byproducts of cellular metabolism and hence in maintaining the health of the brain. This effect is modulated during sleep, suggesting a potentially important mechanism for sleep to maintain both acute homeostasis and long-term cerebral health. The central goal of these studies is to develop a sensitive MRI biomarker of cerebral conformational changes during sleep. This exploratory work aims to establish the sensitivity and reproducibility of MRI as a non-invasive neuroimaging assessment of cerebral changes during natural sleep and sedation.

    San Diego, California

  • Effects of Melatonin on Sleep, Ventilatory Control and Cognition at Altitude.

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Low oxygen at altitude causes pauses in breathing during sleep, called central sleep apnea. Central sleep apnea causes repeated awakenings and poor sleep. Low oxygen itself and the induced oxidative stress can damage mental function which is likely worsened by poor sleep. Reduced mental function due to low oxygen can pose a serious danger to mountain climbers. However there is also mounting evidence that even in populations of people that live at high altitudes and are considered adapted, low oxygen contributes to reductions in learning and memory. Therefore there is a serious need for treatments which may improve sleep, control of breathing and mental function during low oxygen. Melatonin is a hormone produced in the brain during the night which regulates sleep patterns with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A study previously reported that melatonin taken 90 mins before bed at 4,300 m (14,200 ft) induced sleep earlier, reduced awakenings and improved mental performance the following day. However how melatonin caused these effects was not determined. Therefore this study aims to determine how melatonin effects control of breathing, sleep and mental performance during exposure to low oxygen.

    San Diego, California

  • Freshman Sleep and Health Project

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Sleep is a clearly necessary neurobiologic process that influences innumerable aspects of basic daily functions, physical health, and mental well-being. Recent literature shows that college students across the country are experiencing high rates of sleep deprivation. Interestingly, some recent studies have implicated this sleep loss in contributing to weight gain that occurs in the first year of college, also known as the "freshman fifteen." Rates of depression and other mental health issues, which are closely connected to sleep disturbances, are also on the rise in college campuses. The majority of the sleep data obtained in this population has been via questionnaires and self report, and the studies usually include college students at all seniority levels (e.g., freshmen, sophomores, seniors). Here, the investigators outline a novel study investigating how sleep time changes in college freshman, and how it relates to multiple different aspects of their health and functioning over the course of one quarter. As technology has advanced, the ability to easily obtain objective measurements of different health parameters has increased dramatically. The investigators plan to use wireless actigraphy devices to measure sleep over a baseline seven day period in college-bound UCSD students prior to matriculation, and for 2 additional seven day periods during the first quarter of college. To the knowledge of the investigators, this is the first study to directly measure sleep time in college freshman in their normal environment. Effects of sleep time loss will be evaluated through multiple different metrics of physical and mental health. Given the recent link between sleep disturbances and weight gain in college freshman, the investigators will plan to measure weight changes prior to entering college and at two different time points through the first quarter. The investigators will use the PSQ-9 and GAD7 batteries as measures of mental health, obtained at the same time points as the sleep and weight information. As one of the primary consequences of sleep deprivation is on neurocognition in the daytime, the investigators plan to measure vigilant attention using psychomotor vigilance testing (PVT) as well. Screen time use has recently been targeted as a possible contributor to sleep loss in adolescents as well as adults and is something the investigators will attempt to measure as well using a smartphone application. Finally, this project will test the efficacy of a one hour sleep education intervention on improving total sleep time. To the knowledge of the investigators, no other studies have closely examined how total sleep time changes during the first year of college in freshman in relationship to weight and mental health parameters, nor has PVT been done in this context. Additionally, with the increasing concerns regarding screen time use in adolescents and young adults, this study provides prime opportunity to examine this issue in the context of sleep.

    San Diego, California