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Pain clinical trials at UCSD

17 in progress, 9 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Aging People Living With HIV in Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 50 years and up

    Chronic pain impacts a large proportion of aging people living with HIV (aPLWH) and involves factors directly related to HIV (neurotoxicity) and psychosocial co-morbidities common in aPLWH (i.e. social isolation and loneliness). The investigators hypothesize that novel interventions that acknowledge these psychosocial co-morbidities may improve the efficacy of chronic pain management and minimize the use of potentially dangerous medications. This grant proposes to adapt and pilot a pain psychotherapy approach using group acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in aPLWH with chronic pain.

    San Diego, California

  • Chronic Low Back Pain and Meditation

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The purpose of this research study is to see if and how mindfulness meditation affects pain. Specifically, we are interested in assessing if mindfulness is associated with the release of naturally occurring opiates in the body, in response to intravenous (IV) administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone during a chronic low back pain provoking procedure.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Mechanisms of Affective Touch in Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study compares how different types of touch found in massage therapies impact pain perception, and whether these effects differ in individuals with and without chronic pain. This study also examines psychological factors that may predict differences in touch perception in individuals with chronic pain. This research will improve our understanding of whether and how massage therapies can benefit pain and health, and whether this differs in people who suffer from chronic pain.

    La Jolla, California

  • Mindful Action for Pain

    open to all eligible people

    An emerging scientific model that has been applied to chronic pain is the psychological flexibility (PF) model. PF refers to the ability to behave consistently with one's values even in the face of unwanted thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations such as pain. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is the best known treatment derived from the PF model and is as effective as the gold standard Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), but falls short on achieving meaningful changes in functional improvement. Although ACT was designed to impact PF, methods from different treatment approaches are also consistent with the model. An experiential strategy that holds promise for enhancing PF is formal mindfulness meditation, a practice used to train non-judgmental awareness and attention to present-moment experiences, which has never been tested within the PF model. There is compelling theoretical and empirical rationale that the mechanisms underlying formal mindfulness meditation will bolster PF processes and thereby can be applied to facilitate functional improvement. To test this, the principal investigator, has developed a novel 8-week group-based intervention, Mindful Action for Pain (MAP), which integrates formal mindfulness meditation with experiential methods from different evidence-based treatment approaches in accordance with the PF model. MAP is designed such that daily mindfulness meditation practice is used to develop the capacity to more completely utilize strategies to address the key psychosocial barriers (e.g., pain catastrophizing) to optimal functioning. This CDA-2 project consists of two phases. Phase 1 (years 1 - 2) consists of using qualitative and quantitative methods to iteratively develop and refine MAP over the course of 4 MAP cycles (n = 20). Phase 2 (years 3 - 5) consists of a pilot RCT (n = 86) of MAP vs. CBT for chronic pain (CBT-CP) in order to establish feasibility of a future large-scale trial and estimate the preliminary impact of MAP. Functional improvement will be measured by reductions in pain interference (primary clinical outcome). Further, meditation adherence will be assessed to explore dose-response relationships with functional improvement, and objective measures of physical activity (actigraphy) will be captured to explore the psychophysical impact of MAP.

    San Diego, California

  • Mindfulness and Chronic Low Back Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The purpose of this study is to see if mindfulness, a form of mental training, or listening to a book alters brain activation in response to raising your leg that may produce the feeling of pain. A technique called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows scientists to determine which parts of the brain are active during a particular task. This study will provide new information about how mindfulness affects the brain.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Neurofeedback-EEG-VR System for Non-opioid Pain Therapy

    open to eligible people ages 17-90

    This study will assess the feasibility of developing the Neurofeedback-EEG-VR (NEVR) system for non-opioid pain therapy. Subjects suffering from pain will undergo sessions involving VR and Neurofeedback training and their pain will be assessed.

    San Diego, California

  • Patient Retrospective Outcomes (PRO)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will evaluate de-identified (anonymous) data in subject medical charts to review the clinical outcomes of various treatment approaches in the treatment of chronic pain.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • StimRouter Registry Clinical Protocol

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Registry study will prospectively evaluate the long-term effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of the StimRouter Neuromodulation System, along with evaluating the technical performance of StimRouter, surgical outcomes, health-related quality of life, concomitant medical use, and subject's impression of improvement.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Yoga and Mantram for Chronic Pain and PTSD

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    PTSD is prevalent among Veterans and is associated with physical and functional impairments in addition to PTSD symptoms. Veterans with PTSD experience more chronic pain and pain-related functional limitations than Veterans without PTSD. Mind-body interventions such as yoga and meditation are non-pharmacological options for treating both chronic pain and PTSD. This pilot study will add an existing mantram repetition (MR) component designed for Veterans with PTSD to an active yoga intervention known to improve function in chronic back pain patients. The study will examine the acceptability of the interventions, adverse events, and the feasibility of recruitment, attendance, retention, treatment fidelity, and assessments by recruiting and randomizing 32 VA patients with PTSD to either yoga plus MR or to a relaxation/health education control. Health outcomes including pain-related function, pain, and PTSD symptoms will be measured. If feasible, the data will be used to plan a full-scale trial of enhanced yoga for pain in VA patients with PTSD.

    San Diego, California

  • Acupuncture in the Emergency Department for Pain Management

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Our goal is to use the U01 mechanism to conduct a two-arm multisite, feasibility RCT (Acupuncture vs Usual Care) to refine procedures for conducting a future fully powered multi-site RCT. The effort will be led by the BraveNet Coordinating Center at Einstein and include 3 BraveNet PBRN sites University Hospitals/ Case Western Reserve University (UH/Case), Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), and University of California-San Diego (UCSD). During Year 1 (Aim 1), we will develop the manualized acupuncture intervention with consensus from experts in the delivery of acupuncture for acute pain. At the end of Year 1 (prior to the start of the RCT), a study investigator meeting will be held to ensure consistent training of all study coordinators and acupuncturists to the study data collection, human subjects, intervention delivery, and reporting requirements. In Year 2-3 (Aim 2), we will enroll 165 participants (55 per site) into the randomized trial (1:1 assignment to Acupuncture or Usual Care) over a ~9-month enrollment period for each site. Sites will participate in the study sequentially, thus general findings from the implementation evaluation may be used to improve implementation at subsequent sites. Treatment outcomes include pain intensity, state anxiety and pain medication utilization within the ED (via EHR data extraction). In Aim 2a, 75 structured qualitative interviews of ED providers, staff, study acupuncturists (~10 per site) and acupuncture patients (~15 per site) and direct observation at each site will be used to identify barriers and facilitators of successful implementation. The Implementation Evaluation includes two broad categories of data: implementation outcomes (collected in Aim 2 as the feasibility study is conducted at each site) and explanatory factors (Aim 2a).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Combining Mechanisms for Better Outcomes (COMBO)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) with multiple modalities as compared to conventional SCS in patients with chronic pain when using the Boston Scientific Spectra WaveWriter SCS System.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Compassion Meditation vs. Health Education for Veterans

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Chronic pain (CP) is a major health problem for military Veterans, and CP is often associated with comorbid mental health problems, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. CP with psychological comorbidity is associated with increased healthcare costs, medication use, risk of suicide and rates of disability and reduced quality of life. Current empirically supported treatments do not always lead to substantial improvements (up to 50% of patients drop out or are do not respond to treatment). This project was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel intervention for addressing these challenges. Compassion meditation (CM), a meditative practice that focuses on the wish to remove suffering, is a contemplative practice that has promise for the amelioration of physical and mental health problems as well as promoting positive affect and improving quality of life. This study will evaluate the efficacy of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training for Chronic Pain with Psychological Comorbidity (CBCT-CP+) compared to Health Education while Living with Pain (H.E.L.P.) control condition, in a sample of among Veterans with CP conditions and psychological comorbidity.

    San Diego, California

  • Cryoanalgesia to Prevent Acute and Chronic Pain Following Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Masked, Sham-Controlled Study

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The ultimate objective of the proposed line of research is to determine if cryoanalgesia is an effective adjunctive treatment for pain in the period immediately following various painful surgical procedures; and, if this analgesic modality decreases the risk of persistent postoperative pain, or "chronic" pain. The objective of the proposed pilot study is to optimize the protocol and collect data to power subsequent, definitive clinical trials. Specific Aim 1: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia decreases the incidence and severity of post-surgical pain. Hypothesis 1a (primary): The severity of surgically-related pain will be significantly decreased on postoperative day 2 with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1b: The incidence of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1c: The severity of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Specific Aim 2: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia improves postoperative functioning. Hypothesis 2a: Following primary unilateral knee and shoulder arthroplasty as well as rotator cuff repair, joint range of motion will be significantly increased within the year following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 2b: Following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, inspiratory spirometry will be improved within the month following surgery with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving solely standard-of-care treatment.

    San Diego, California

  • Gabapentin and Tizanidine for Insomnia in Chronic Pain

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover trial aimed at assessing the effect of gabapentin and tizanidine, two pain medications, on insomnia in chronic pain patients.

    La Jolla, California

  • PROLONG Prospective, Multi-center, Open-label, Post-market Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been shown to be effective for relieving intractable chronic pain. However, a portion of patients who initially succeed with SCS will eventually lose their therapeutic benefit. Reliable methods have not been identified for restoring neuromodulation benefit to this underserved population, so additional research is required. This study will prospectively observe subjects who utilize Abbott neurostimulation devices after failing to sustain pain relief with their previous SCS system. The effectiveness of Abbott systems in restoring neuromodulation benefit will be evaluated over the course of a two-year follow-up.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • ReActiv8 Implantable Neurostimulation System for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this trial is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ReActiv8 for the treatment of adults with Chronic Low Back Pain when used in conjunction with medical management.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Standard of Care Therapy With or Without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and/or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

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