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Sleep Disorders clinical trials at UCSD

22 in progress, 13 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Seltorexant Compared to Quetiapine XR as Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressants in Adult and Elderly Participants With Major Depressive Disorder With Insomnia Symptoms Who Have Responded Inadequately to Antidepressant Therapy

    open to eligible people ages 18-74

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of seltorexant compared with quetiapine extended-release (XR) as adjunctive therapy to an antidepressant drug in treatment response in participants with major depressive disorder with insomnia symptoms (MDDIS) who have had an inadequate response to current antidepressant therapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI).

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Combination Drug-Therapy for Patients With Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common and associated with many adverse health consequences, but many patients are unable to tolerate standard therapies such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and thus remain untreated. Single-drug therapies have shown promising results in treating sleep apnea, but on average patients have only experienced partial relief. Multi-drug therapy may offer a more effective treatment approach. The goal of this study is to test the effect of combination therapy with three FDA-approved drugs (Diamox [acetazolamide], Lunesta [eszopiclone] +/- Effexor [venlafaxine]) on OSA severity and physiology.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Do Endotypes Predict Response and Sequelae in OSA Patients

    open to eligible people ages 21-65

    This study will investigate why some people have Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and how the underlying cause may relate to OSA manifestations (including sleepiness and high blood pressure) and response to different therapeutic approaches (ie CPAP, eszopiclone, and supplemental oxygen). Understanding why someone has OSA could affect how best to treat that individual, but may also have an impact on what problems the disease might cause.

    La Jolla, California

  • Effect of Myofunctional Therapy on OSA

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The primary medical therapies for patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea syndrome (OSA) require the use of medical devices on a nightly basis to help control breathing during sleep, which can be difficult for patients with mild-to-moderate disease. Because many patients use these therapies on a limited basis, or stop using them altogether, they continue to be at increased risk of the consequences of untreated OSA. Untreated and undertreated OSA compounds the risk of OSA consequences over time, particularly with increasing age and weight. Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy (OMT) takes a rehabilitative approach to OSA and is comprised of isotonic and isometric exercises that target the oral (e.g., tongue) and oropharyngeal (e.g., soft palate, lateral pharyngeal wall) to help restore normal breathing and airway patency at night while asleep. Should the study have positive findings, OMT could become an important alternative therapy for patients with mild-to-moderate disease because patients could utilize a therapy that improves their nighttime breathing through daytime exercises and without the need for a burdensome medical device.

    San Diego, California

  • Is Obstructive Sleep Apnea Important in the Development of Alzheimer's Disease?

    open to eligible people ages 65-85

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in older adults and has recently been implicated in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research has shown that sleep disruptions have caused memory impairment. Sleep apnea is a form of sleep disruption. We would like to examine how obstructive sleep apnea may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    La Jolla, California

  • National Adaptive Trial for PTSD Related Insomnia

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    Many Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have trouble sleeping or have frequent nightmares. So far, no medication has been approved for treatment of insomnia in PTSD. The purpose of this research study is to find out if taking medications called trazodone, eszopiclone, or gabapentin can help decrease symptoms of insomnia in patients with PTSD. PTSD is a form of intense anxiety which sometimes results from severe trauma. Symptoms may include nightmares, flashbacks, troublesome memories, difficulty sleeping, poor concentration, irritability, anger, and emotional withdrawal. Insomnia is a disorder that can make it hard to fall sleep, stay asleep or cause a person to wake up too early and not be able to fall back to sleep.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Optimizing Post-operative Recovery in Bariatric Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Undergoing Outpatient Surgery: A Comparison of Sugammadex and Neostigmine

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This study assesses the efficacy of sugammadex against neostigmine for hastening recovery from neuromuscular blockade and optimizing pulmonary function in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea presenting for outpatient surgery. Both drugs are used in anesthesiology to reverse neuromuscular blockade that is given in the setting of inducing and maintaining general anesthesia.

    La Jolla, California

  • OSA PAP Treatment for Veterans With SUD and PTSD on Residential Treatment Unit

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Substance use disorder (SUD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently co-occur and having both disorders is associated with greater psychological and functional impairment than having either disorder alone. This is especially true in residential settings where both disorders are more severe than outpatient settings. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly comorbid with both disorders and untreated OSA is associated with worse functional impairment across multiple domains, worse quality of life, worse PTSD, higher suicidal ideation, and higher substance use and relapse rates. Treating OSA with evidence-based positive airway pressure (PAP) in Veterans with SUD/PTSD on a residential unit is a logical way to maximize treatment adherence and treatment outcomes. This study compares OSA treatment while on a SUD/PTSD residential unit to a waitlist control group. The investigators hypothesize that treating OSA on the residential unit, compared to the waitlist control, will have better functional, SUD, and PTSD outcomes.

    San Diego, California

  • Prospective Randomized Trial of CPAP for SDB in Patients Who Use Opioids

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Patients with chronic pain who use opioids appear to be at increased risk for breathing issues during sleep, termed sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Treatment of SDB often consists of use of a device during sleep that provides continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via a mask interface. The goal of this study is to determine whether patients with chronic pain who use opioids and have SDB might benefit from the use of CPAP in terms of sleep quality, pain, quality of life, and other measures. In addition, the study will examine whether these individuals are able to adhere to CPAP, which will be important for future studies. Lastly, we anticipate that CPAP won't work for everyone due to the changes that opioids can cause in breathing patterns. We will examine how often CPAP is ineffective, and whether we can predict which individuals are least likely to resolve their SDB with CPAP.

    San Diego, California

  • Self-Management of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Settings

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major chronic condition affecting the quality of life of millions of Americans. Per the Institute of Medicine new treatment adherence strategies are needed to help improve the quality of care, reduce social and economic costs, and help those with chronic conditions, including OSA, live healthier and more productive lives through better management of their conditions. Adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is disappointingly low, and new methods to increase both the use and efficacy of therapy are needed. Historically, patients have not been formally instructed to adjust their pressure settings on their PAP devices; practically, however, allowing patients to adjust their pressure settings fosters engagement, self-confidence, and control with therapy.

    San Diego, California

  • Sleep for Stroke Management and Recovery Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with positive airway pressure starting shortly after acute ischemic stroke or high risk TIA (1) reduces recurrent stroke, acute coronary syndrome, and all-cause mortality 6 months after the event, and (2) improves stroke outcomes at 3 months in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Sleep-SMART for Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 60 years and up

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is the first-line treatment for chronic insomnia. However, cognitive impairments may limit progress in CBT-I for older Veterans with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). This study will develop and pilot test Sleep-SMART (Sleep Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy), an adapted CBT-I treatment that incorporates Cognitive Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy (CogSMART) principles with a goal of improving sleep treatment and rehabilitation outcomes for Veterans with co-occurring MCI and insomnia. The innovation of this study centers on enhancing CBT-I by providing supportive cognitive strategies designed to improve treatment adherence, learning, and acceptability. The investigators anticipate that by improving sleep it can concurrently improve daily functioning, increase quality of life, prevent or reduce late-life disability, and mitigate long-term cognitive decline in this Veteran population.

    San Diego, California

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea Endotypes and Impact on Phenotypes of People Living With HIV

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The investigators seek to understand how the different underlying causes of OSA affect the way people living with HIV (PLWH) experience OSA. The investigators also want to understand how symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea improve with treatment, and if this too, is affected by the underlying cause of OSA in that individual

    San Diego, California

  • Acetazolamide for Obstructive Sleep Apnea to Improve Heart Health

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a severe type of snoring causing people to choke in their sleep. It affects millions of Americans, causing many health problems. For example, patients with OSA often feel very sleepy and are at risk of falling asleep while driving. OSA also causes elevated blood pressure increasing the risk for heart attacks and strokes. Patients with OSA are often treated with a face-mask that helps them breath at night but can be difficult to tolerate. In fact, about half the patients eventually stop using this mask. Because there are few other treatments (and no drug therapy), many OSA patients are still untreated. Of note, especially young adults (i.e. 18 to 50 years old) benefit from treating their OSA, but they are also less likely to use the mask. Acetazolamide (a mild diuretic drug) has been used for over 50 years to treat many different conditions and is well tolerated. Recent data suggest, that acetazolamide may help OSA patients to not choke in their sleep and lower their blood pressure. Especially young adults with OSA are likely to respond well to this drug. Further, its low cost (66¢/day) and once- daily dosing may be particularly attractive for young OSA patients unable or unwilling to wear a mask each night. But previous studies had many limitations and did not focus on young adults. The goal of this study is to test if acetazolamide can improve sleep apnea and cardiovascular health in young adults with OSA (18-50 years old), and how it does that. Thus, we will treat 46 young OSA patients with acetazolamide or placebo for 2 weeks each. The order in which participants receive the drug or placebo will be randomized. At the end of each 2 week period we will assess OSA severity and cardiovascular health. Thus, this study will help assess acetazolamide's potential value for OSA treatment, and may also help to identify patients who are most likely to respond to acetazolamide (including select individuals >50 years of age). Ultimately, this work promises a drug therapy option for millions of OSA patients who are unable to tolerate current treatments.

    La Jolla, California

  • Advancing Understanding of Transportation Options

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Stage II randomized, controlled, longitudinal trial seeks to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and effects of a driving decision aid use among geriatric patients and providers. This multi-site trial will (1) test the driving decision aid (DDA) in improving decision making and quality (knowledge, decision conflict, values concordance and behavior intent); and (2) determine its effects on specific subpopulations of older drivers (stratified for cognitive function, decisional capacity, and attitudinally readiness for a mobility transition). The overarching hypotheses are that the DDA will help older adults make high-quality decisions, which will mitigate the negative psychosocial impacts of driving reduction, and that optimal DDA use will target certain populations and settings.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • CBD for Sleep in People With HIV

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will obtain preliminary information about whether, and at what dose, cannabidiol (CBD) may help with insomnia in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The study will be a 5-week randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled phase II trial using daily oral CBD doses between 50mg and 600mg. Sleep problems will be measured using a wrist-worn device and by self-report. Performance on tests of thinking skills will be compared before and after CBD/placebo treatment. Positive study results will provide support for the use of CBD as a potential treatment for insomnia.

    San Diego, California

  • Extracellular microRNA: Biomarkers of Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Adolescents & Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Using a prospective observational approach and a clinical trial design comparing the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure to diet and exercise, investigators plan to evaluate how obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to endothelial dysfunction in adolescents and young adults and whether treatment of OSA can improve endothelial dysfunction. Concurrently, investigators will measure miR 92a/miR 210 levels in all subjects at baseline and following therapy to determine whether miR 92a/miR 210 levels reliably predict endothelial dysfunction in patients and responses to therapy.

  • Gabapentin and Tizanidine for Insomnia in Chronic Pain

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover trial aimed at assessing the effect of gabapentin and tizanidine, two pain medications, on insomnia in chronic pain patients.

    La Jolla, California

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment in Serious Mental Illness

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Serious mental illnesses (SMI) like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are two of the most disabling and costly chronic illnesses worldwide. A high proportion of adults with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have sleep disorders, like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but tend to be underdiagnosed and undertreated compared to the general population. This study aims to examine feasibility, acceptance, and impact of OSA treatment and how it affects cognitive function in people with SMI.

    La Jolla, California

  • The Cardiovascular Consequences of Sleep Apnea Plus COPD (Overlap Syndrome)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Aim 1: The Investigators will perform a cross-sectional study to examine vascular risk in individuals with OVS compared with matched individuals with OSA alone or COPD alone. The PI will examine a panel of biomarkers including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (right ventricular mass primary outcome), flow mediated vasodilation, plasma biomarkers (BNP, troponin, hsCRP, ST2, galectin3, miR-210). This aim will allow the team to test the hypothesis that individuals with OVS have increased vascular risk compared with matched individuals with OSA alone or COPD alone. This aim will also allow the team to compare the magnitude of the effect of OSA vs. COPD vs OVS for design of subsequent basic and clinical studies. Aim 2: The Investigators will perform an interventional study in individuals with OVS to compare the impact of bi-level therapy with that of oxygen therapy (the current standard of care). The team will assess the same panel of biomarkers as in Aim 1 to determine the impact of treatment on the observed abnormalities. This aim will allow the team to test the hypothesis that bi-level therapy is superior to oxygen in the treatment of individuals with OVS from the standpoint of right ventricular mass and other cardiovascular risk parameters/outcomes. Our assessments of biomarkers will help to define potential causal pathways for our findings and will allow determination of appropriate biomarkers for subsequent multicenter studies.

  • The Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Its Treatment on Decision Making

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an extremely common disease with inadequately explored neurocognitive consequences. The investigators will study OSA patients before and after treatment to understand how OSA changes decision making abilities, and whether treatment can reverse such cognitive changes. These results could provide deeper insight into how OSA affects decision making either temporarily or permanently, and provide another rationale or motivation for treatment of OSA in adults.

    San Diego, California

  • Underlying Mechanisms of Obesity-induced Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Obesity is a common risk factor for the development of obstructive sleep apnea. However, not all subjects with obesity develop obstructive sleep apnea. This study will attempt to determine the mechanistic drivers between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea.

    La Jolla, California

Our lead scientists for Sleep Disorders research studies include .

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