Summary

Eligibility
for people ages 18 years and up (full criteria)
Dates
study started
estimated completion
Principal Investigator
by Laura Case
Headshot of Laura Case
Laura Case

Description

Summary

The strongest psychological predictor of persistent pain after surgery is anxiety before surgery. The weight of blanket a person uses overnight may alter both anxiety and pain levels. The proposed study will determine whether a heavier or lighter blanket alters presurgical anxiety or postsurgical pain in individuals undergoing a breast surgery. We will also study whether any blanket-induced changes in postsurgical pain are related to reductions in anxiety before surgery induced by the blanket. Finally, we will examine clinical and psychological factors that might explain differences in how surgical patients respond to blanket weight. This research will improve our understanding of whether blanket weight can alter anxiety before a surgery or pain after a surgery.

Official Title

Effect of Weighted Blankets on Perioperative Anxiety and Postsurgical Pain

Keywords

Pain, Postsurgical mastectomy anxiety blankets Pain, Postoperative Weighted blanket Heavier blanket Lighter blanket

Eligibility

You can join if…

Open to people ages 18 years and up

  • Fluent in English
  • Undergoing breast surgery
  • Willing to sleep with a weighted blanket for up to 3 months
  • BMI of at least 18.5 and able to safely lift up to 15lb
  • Willing and able to use their personal smartphone for the ecological momentary assessment app to submit ratings using personal data plan

You CAN'T join if...

  • Pregnancy
  • Chronic high-dose opioid use
  • Current or previous use of a weighted blanket
  • Claustrophobia
  • Incarceration

Lead Scientist at UCSD

  • Laura Case
    Assistant Adjunct Professor, Anesthesiology, Vc-health Sciences-schools. Authored (or co-authored) 21 research publications

Details

Status
not yet accepting patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
University of California, San Diego
ID
NCT05324254
Study Type
Interventional
Participants
Expecting 168 study participants
Last Updated