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Colorectal Cancer clinical trials at UCSD
19 in progress, 10 open to new patients

  • A Study of Epacadostat in Combination With Pembrolizumab and Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors (ECHO-207/KEYNOTE-723)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, nonrandomized, Phase 1/2 study in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. Phase 1 is an assessment to evaluate the safety and tolerability of epacadostat when given in combination with pembrolizumab and chemotherapy. Once the recommended doses have been confirmed, subjects with advanced or metastatic CRC, PDAC, NSCLC (squamous or nonsquamous), UC, SCCHN or any advanced or metastatic solid tumor who progressed on previous therapy with a PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor will be enrolled in Phase 2.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A Study of Napabucasin (BBI-608) in Combination With FOLFIRI in Adult Patients With Previously Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an international multi-center, prospective, open-label, randomized phase 3 trial of the cancer stem cell pathway inhibitor napabucasin plus standard bi-weekly FOLFIRI versus standard bi-weekly FOLFIRI in patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Ibrutinib Combination Therapy in Patients With Selected Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of the combination treatment of ibrutinib with everolimus, paclitaxel, docetaxel, or cetuximab in selected advanced gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumors.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Collecting and Studying Tissue Samples From Patients With HIV-Associated Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RATIONALE: Collecting and studying tissue samples from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    PURPOSE: This research trial studies collecting tissue samples from patients with HIV-related malignancies.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Longitudinal Performance of Epi proColon

    open to eligible people ages 50-74

    This study will evaluate longitudinal performance of Epi proColon with respect to test positivity, longitudinal adherence to Epi proColon screening, adherence to follow-up colonoscopy and diagnostic yield, as well as assay failure rates.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With HIV Associated Relapsed or Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment, or solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of your immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-292 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of LOXO-292 administered orally to patients with advanced solid tumors, including RET-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • PROSPECT: Chemotherapy Alone or Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer involves chemotherapy and radiation, known as 5FUCMT, (the chemotherapy drugs 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine and radiation therapy) prior to surgery. Although radiation therapy to the pelvis has been a standard and important part of treatment for rectal cancer and has been shown to decrease the risk of the cancer coming back in the same area in the pelvis, some patients experience undesirable side effects from the radiation and there have been important advances in chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation which may be of benefit. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, both good and bad, of the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation to chemotherapy using a combination regimen known as FOLFOX, (the drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and leucovorin) and selective use of the standard treatment, depending on response to the FOLFOX. The drugs in the FOLFOX regimen are all FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved and have been used routinely to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A Phase 1/2 Study Exploring the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Combination With Epacadostat (INCB024360) in Subjects With Selected Cancers (INCB 24360-202 / MK-3475-037 / KEYNOTE-037/ ECHO-202)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy when combining MK-3475 and INCB024360 in subjects with certain cancers. This study will be conducted in 2 phases, Phase 1 and Phase 2.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A Phase 2 Randomized, Open-Label Study of RRx-001 vs Regorafenib in Subjects With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This two-stage study is designed to compare the safety and activity between RRx-001 against regorafenib followed by irinotecan-based therapies in a parallel comparative study. Patients who are suffering from advanced or metastatic (meaning the disease has spread) colorectal cancer are invited to participate in this study. There will be two groups of patients (Randomized, open label study), one of these will receive RRx-001 and the other one will receive regorafenib. If patients qualify to participate in this study, they will be randomly assigned to the 'interventional arm' where patients will receive the experimental drug, RRx-001, or the 'control arm' where they will receive the current standard-of-care, Regorafenib. Patients have a 66% chance (2 out of 3) of receiving RRx-001 and a 33 % chance (1 out of 3) of receiving regorafenib. On progression in the first part of the study, provided ECOG performance status is adequate, and if clinically appropriate i.e. there are no absolute or relative contraindications in the opinion of the Investigator, all subjects will enter the second part of the study and receive irinotecan plus bevacizumab. Whether patients are given RRx-001 or regorafenib, they will also receive best supportive care, which includes treatments to help manage side effects and symptoms of cancer. This is an open label study, which means patients will know to which of these treatments, RRx-001 or regorafenib, they are assigned.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A Study of LY3039478 in Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of the study drug known as LY3039478 in combination with other anticancer agents in participants with advanced or metastatic solid tumors.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Colonoscopy Versus Fecal Immunochemical Test in Reducing Mortality From Colorectal Cancer (CONFIRM)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and one of the most preventable cancers. It has been shown in several randomized controlled trials that screening using fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces CRC mortality by 13-33%. While there is strong consensus amongst experts regarding the value of CRC screening, the best approach to screening is not clear. Of the widely recommended modalities, FOBT and colonoscopy are the most commonly used within the United States. FOBT is inexpensive, non-invasive, and its use as a screening tool is supported by the highest quality evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials). Moreover, newer FOBT, such as fecal immunochemical tests or FITs, have advantages over conventional FOBT in terms of both test characteristics and ease of use that make them quite attractive as a population-based screening tool. While colonoscopy is invasive and has higher up-front risks and costs than FOBT, it does afford the opportunity to directly assess the colonic mucosa and is widely believed to be the best test to detect colorectal cancer. In addition, colonoscopy allows for the detection and removal of colorectal adenomas -a well recognized colorectal cancer precursor. There is indirect evidence that suggests colonoscopy is effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality, but to date, no large clinical trials have been completed to support this assumption. While colonoscopy use is increasing, data is emerging that colonoscopy may not be as effective as previously believed. Prior support for colonoscopy as a screening test relied upon effectiveness estimates that now appear to be overly optimistic. Given the invasive nature of colonoscopy, the associated small, but real risk of complications, and dramatically higher costs than other screening tests, it is especially important to determine the true comparative effectiveness of colonoscopy relative to other proven non-invasive options. The investigators propose to perform a, large, simple, multicenter, randomized, parallel group trial directly comparing screening colonoscopy with annual FIT screening in average risk individuals. The hypothesis is that colonoscopy will be superior to FIT in the prevention of colorectal cancer mortality measured over 10 years. Individuals will be enrolled if they are currently eligible for CRC screening (e.g. no colonoscopy in the past 10 years and no FOBT in the past 1 year) and are between 50 and 75 years of age. The investigators will exclude individuals for whom colonoscopy is indicated (e.g. signs or symptoms of CRC, first degree family member with CRC, personal history of colorectal neoplasia or inflammatory bowel disease). All participants will complete baseline demographic, medication, and lifestyle questionnaires (e.g. diet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, frequency of exercise) prior to randomization in a 1:1 ratio to either screening colonoscopy or annual FIT screening (Figure 1). Those testing positive by FIT will undergo evaluation to determine appropriateness for colonoscopy. Screening will be performed in a manner consistent with the currently accepted standard of care in order to determine the comparative effectiveness of the two screening strategies. Participants will be surveyed annually to determine if they have undergone colonoscopy or been diagnosed with CRC. The primary study endpoint will be CRC mortality within 10 years of enrollment. The secondary endpoints are (1) the incidence of CRC within 10 years of enrollment and (2) major complications of colonoscopy. Mortality will be determined through queries of the VA Vital Status File. Cause of death will be determined primarily using death certificates from the National Death Index-Plus database, augmented by adjudication of medical records for known CRC cases where CRC is not listed as a cause of death on the death certificate. The investigators postulate that screening colonoscopy will result in a 40% reduction in CRC mortality over 10 years relative to annual FIT screening. Using a log-rank test with a 2-sided test of significance, =0.05, a sample size of 50,000 participants will be required to test the primary hypothesis with 82% power, assuming a 1% annual rate of crossover from FIT to colonoscopy and a 0.5% annual rate of loss to follow-up. The planned study duration is 12.5 years with 2.5 years of recruitment and 10 years of follow-up for all enrolled participants.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Stage II Colon Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone in treating colon cancer.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • S1013: Validation of Cancer Questionnaire for Skin Toxicities in Patients With Colorectal Cancer or Lung Cancer Receiving Cetuximab, Panitumumab, or Erlotinib Hydrochloride

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Questionnaires that patients can use to assess skin toxicities related to treatment may help identify the intermediate-and long-term effects of cetuximab, panitumumab, or erlotinib hydrochloride.

    PURPOSE: This trial studies the validation of a cancer questionnaire for skin toxicities in patients with colorectal or lung cancer receiving cetuximab, panitumumab, or erlotinib hydrochloride.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Study to Increase Colorectal Screening

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether inreach and outreach strategies will be superior to usual care, and combination of both will be superior to either strategy alone.

  • Veliparib, Pembrolizumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    La Jolla, California and other locations