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HER2 clinical trials at UCSD
11 in progress, 6 open to eligible people

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel with or without carboplatin work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide is more effective when followed by paclitaxel alone or paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating triple-negative breast cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • DS-8201a in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Expressing or -Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the efficacy of trastuzumab deruxtecan in HER2-over-expressing and/or HER2-mutated advanced NSCLC subjects.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • FATE-NK100 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Monoclonal Antibody in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, single-dose, open-label, dose-escalation study. The study will be conducted in three parts (i.e. regimens) in an outpatient setting as follows: - Regimen A: FATE-NK100 as a monotherapy in subjects with advanced solid tumor malignancies. - Regimen B: FATE-NK100 in combination with trastuzumab in subjects with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) advanced breast cancer, HER2+ advanced gastric cancer or other advanced HER2+ solid tumors. - Regimen C: FATE-NK100 in combination with cetuximab in subjects with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) or head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC), or other epidermal growth factor receptor 1 positive (EGFR1+) advanced solid tumors.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • FT500 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    FT500 is an off-the-shelf, iPSC-derived NK cell product that can bridge innate and adaptive immunity, and has the potential to overcome multiple mechanisms of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) resistance. The preclinical data provide compelling evidence supporting the clinical investigation of FT500 as monotherapy and in combination with ICI in subjects with advanced solid tumors.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Long-term, Non-interventional, Observational Study Following Treatment With Fate Therapeutics FT500 Cellular Immunotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Subjects who previously took part in the FT500-101 study and received allogeneic NK cell immunotherapy will take part in this long term follow-up study. Subjects will automatically enroll into study FT-003 once they have withdrawn or complete the parent interventional study. The purpose of this study is to provide long-term safety and survival data for subjects who have participated in the parent study. No additional study drug will be given, but subjects can receive other therapies for their cancer while they are being followed for long term safety in this study.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • SYD985 vs. Physician's Choice in Participants With HER2-positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that SYD985 [(vic-)trastuzumab duocarmazine] is superior to physician's choice in prolonging progression free survival.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • A Study of Neratinib Plus Capecitabine Versus Lapatinib Plus Capecitabine in Patients With HER2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Have Received Two or More Prior HER2 Directed Regimens in the Metastatic Setting

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a randomized, multi-center, multinational, open-label, active-controlled, parallel design study of the combination of neratinib plus capecitabine versus the combination of lapatinib plus capecitabine in HER2+ MBC patients who have received two or more prior HER2 directed regimens in the metastatic setting.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A Study of Pertuzumab in Addition to Chemotherapy and Trastuzumab as Adjuvant Therapy in Participants With Human Epidermal Growth Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Primary Breast Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-arm study will assess the safety and efficacy of pertuzumab in addition to chemotherapy plus trastuzumab as adjuvant therapy in participants with operable HER2-positive primary breast cancer. This study will be carried out in collaboration with the Breast International Group (BIG).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Pacltaxel With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Women With HER2-Positive Node-Positive or High-Risk Node-Negative Breast Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab to see how well they work compared to combination chemotherapy alone in treating women with breast cancer that is human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and has spread to the lymph nodes or high-risk and has not spread to the lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab can locate tumor cells and either kill them or deliver tumor-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without trastuzumab in treating breast cancer.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Lymph Node-Positive and High-Risk, Lymph Node-Negative Breast Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel to see how well they work with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes (lymph node-positive) or cancer that has not spread to the lymph nodes but is at high risk for returning (high-risk, lymph node-negative breast cancer). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab may also stop the growth of breast cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Giving chemotherapy after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery and help prevent the tumor from returning. It is not yet known whether doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel are more effective with or without bevacizumab.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Paclitaxel, Nab-paclitaxel, or Ixabepilone With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies the side effects and how well different chemotherapy regimens with or without bevacizumab work in treating patients with stage IIIC or stage IV breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation (nab-paclitaxel), and ixabepilone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab may block tumor growth by targeting certain cells and slowing the growth of blood vessels to the tumor. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is more effective in treating patients with breast cancer.

    San Diego, California and other locations

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