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Mild Cognitive Impairment clinical trials at UCSD
6 in progress, 3 open to new patients

  • Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3 (ADNI3) Protocol

    open to eligible people ages 55-90

    Since its launch in 2004, the overarching aim of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has been realized in informing the design of therapeutic trials in AD. ADNI3 continues the previously funded ADNI-1, ADNI-GO, and ADNI-2 studies that have been combined public/private collaborations between academia and industry to determine the relationships between the clinical, cognitive, imaging, genetic and biochemical biomarker characteristics of the entire spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The overall goal of the study is to continue to discover, optimize, standardize, and validate clinical trial measures and biomarkers used in AD research.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    open to eligible people ages 55 years and up

    The number of older Veterans with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) seeking care within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is increasing and is expected to increase more rapidly as Vietnam era Veterans age. The cognitive effects of MCI and subsequent neurodegenerative disorders can adversely affect a Veteran's ability to function independently and failure to provide appropriate intervention can result in an increased need for healthcare services and VA benefits in the future. The VA currently spends over $19,000 annually per patient to care for Veterans with dementia (Zhu et al., 2009), and delaying the onset of dementia even by one to two years will result in substantial financial savings to the VA and quality of life gains for the Veteran. Since present pharmacological interventions have demonstrated limited efficacy, alternative treatments are needed. Therefore, an evidence-based cognitive training intervention that optimally addresses the needs of older Veterans with MCI is of critical importance to the VA patient care mission.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Phase II Trial of Tesamorelin for Cognition in Aging HIV-Infected Persons

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    The aim of this study is to test whether tesamorelin, in combination with a text-messaging application to help with motivation and adherence, will significantly improve memory and thinking in HIV.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • A Study of Brain Aging in Vietnam War Veterans

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common combat related problems and may be associated with a greater risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study is to examine the possible connections between TBI and PTSD, and the signs and symptoms of AD on Veterans as they age. The information collected will help to learn more about how these injuries may affect Veterans of the Vietnam War as they grow older, as well as Veterans of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, who also have these types of combat related injuries.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to build upon the information obtained in the original Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI1) and ADNI-GO (Grand Opportunity; a study funded through an NIH grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act), to examine how brain imaging technology can be used with other tests to measure the progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer's disease (AD). ADNI2 seeks to inform the neuroscience of AD. This information will aid in the early detection of AD, and in measuring the effectiveness of treatments in future clinical trials.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Impact of Combined Behavioral Interventions on Cognitive Outcomes in MCI

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Vast evidence supports use of physical exercise and cognitive stimulation for lowering risk for cognitive decline and dementia, with combinations of non-pharmacological interventions providing greatest promise for impacting cognitive aging. This, paired with limited cognitive benefits from pharmacological interventions in dementia, has shifted focus to non-pharmacological interventions administered earlier in the disease course. This application, therefore, proposes a randomized controlled trial (RCT; 12-week active intervention, 3- and 6-month follow-up) comparing 3 conditions: walking program (guided progressive increases in weekly step counts), computer-based cognitive training program (Brain HQ, Posit Science), and combination of the exercise and cognitive program, on cognitive, functional, and diagnostic outcomes in 60 sedentary, community-dwelling adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    La Jolla, California

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