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Colorectal Tumor clinical trials at UCSD

26 in progress, 13 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • DSP107 Alone and in Combination With Atezolizumab for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Part 1: A first-in-human, open-label, Phase I dose escalation study of DSP107 monotherapy and combination therapy with atezolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. Part 2: Preliminary efficacy assessment of DSP107 in combination with atezolizumab in second or third line treatment of non small cell lung cancer. Preliminary efficacy assessment of DSP107 as a single agent or in combination with atezolizumab in third line treatment of colorectal cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Selpercatinib (LOXO-292) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer (LIBRETTO-001)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is an open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of selpercatinib (also known as LOXO-292) administered orally to participants with advanced solid tumors, including rearranged during transfection (RET)-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A2B530, a Logic-gated CAR T, in Subjects With Solid Tumors That Express CEA and Have Lost HLA-A*02 Expression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to test A2B530,an autologous logic-gated Tmod™ CAR T-cell product in subjects with solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic cancer (PANC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and other solid tumors that express CEA and have lost HLA-A*02 expression. The main questions this study aims to answer are: - Phase 1: What is the maximum or recommended dose of A2B530 that is safe for patients - Phase 2: Does the recommended dose of A2B530 kill the solid tumor cells and protect the patient's healthy cells Participants will be required to perform study procedures and assessments, and will also receive the following study treatments: - Enrollment and Apheresis in BASECAMP-1 (NCT04981119) - Preconditioning Lymphodepletion (PCLD) Regimen - A2B530 Tmod CAR T cells at the assigned dose

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • A2B694, a Logic-gated CAR T, in Subjects With Solid Tumors That Express MSLN and Have Lost HLA-A*02 Expression

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to test A2B694, an autologous logic-gated Tmod™ CAR T-cell product in subjects with solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic cancer (PANC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), ovarian cancer (OVCA), mesothelioma (MESO), and other solid tumors that express MSLN and have lost HLA-A*02 expression. The main questions this study aims to answer are: Phase 1: What is the recommended dose of A2B694 that is safe for patients Phase 2: Does the recommended dose of A2B694 kill the solid tumor cells and protect the patient's healthy cells Participants will be required to perform study procedures and assessments, and will also receive the following study treatments: Enrollment and Apheresis in BASECAMP-1 (NCT04981119) Preconditioning Lymphodepletion (PCLD) Regimen A2B694 Tmod CAR T cells at the assigned dose

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Activity of GDC-6036 Alone or in Combination in Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors With a KRAS G12C Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase I dose-escalation and dose-expansion study that will evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and preliminary activity of GDC-6036 in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors with a KRAS G12C mutation.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Tisotumab Vedotin for Patients With Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will study tisotumab vedotin to find out whether it is an effective treatment alone or with other anticancer drugs for certain solid tumors and what side effects (unwanted effects) may occur. There are seven parts to this study. - In Part A, the treatment will be given to participants every 3 weeks (3-week cycles). - In Part B, participants will receive tisotumab vedotin on Days 1, 8, and 15 every 4-week cycle. - In Part C, participants will receive tisotumab vedotin on Days 1 and 15 of every 4-week cycle. - In Part D, participants will be given treatment on Day 1 of every 3-week cycle. Participants in Part D will get tisotumab vedotin with either: - Pembrolizumab or, - Pembrolizumab and carboplatin, or - Pembrolizumab and cisplatin - In Part E, participants will receive tisotumab vedotin on Days 1 and 15 of every 4-week cycle. - In Part F, participants will receive tisotumab vedotin on Days 1, 15, and 29 of every 6-week cycle. Participants in Part F will get tisotumab vedotin with pembrolizumab. - In Part G, participants will receive tisotumab vedotin on Days 1, 15, and 29 of every 6-week cycle. Participants in Part G will get tisotumab vedotin with pembrolizumab and carboplatin.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Head to Head Mailed Cologuard to Mailed FIT

    open to eligible people ages 45-49

    The objective of this pilot study is to compare the effectiveness of mailed outreach of two stool based tests, Cologuard and the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in screening eligible adults ages 45-49 receiving care at the University of California San Diego Health system.

    La Jolla, California

  • Performance of SGM-101 for the Delineation of Primary and Recurrent Tumor and Metastases in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The performance of SGM-101, an intraoperative imaging agent, will be compared to that of standard "white light" visualization during surgical resections of colorectal cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Covalent Menin Inhibitor BMF-219 in Adult Patients With KRAS Driven Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, and Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase 1/1b dose finding study to determine the OBD(s) and RP2D(s) of BMF-219, a covalent menin inhibitor small molecule, in subjects with KRAS mutated unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic NSCLC (Cohort 1), PDAC (Cohort 2), and CRC (Cohort 3).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • JANX008 in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18-100

    This study is a first-in-human (FIH), Phase 1/1b, open-label, multicenter dose escalation and dose expansion study to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary anti-tumor activity of JANX008 in adult subjects with advanced or metastatic carcinoma expressing EGFR.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Testing the Combination of the Anti-Cancer Drugs Temozolomide and M1774 to Evaluate Their Safety and Effectiveness

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of temozolomide and M1774 and how well they works in treating patients with cancer that has spread from where it first started (primary site) to other places in the body (metastatic) and may have spread to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced). Temozolomide is in a class of medications called alkylating agents. It works by damaging the cell's deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and may kill tumor cells and slow down or stop tumor growth. M1774 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Adding M1774 to temozolomide may shrink or stabilize cancer for longer than temozolomide alone.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Early Detection of Advanced Adenomas and Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study aims to develop a highly sensitive, specific, and cost-effective blood assay for early detection of colorectal adenomas and cancer, using advanced machine learning and state-of-the-art biological analyses.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Surveillance Colonoscopy in Older Adults: The SurvOlderAdults Study

    open to eligible people ages 75 years and up

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. Detection and removal of polyps can reduce risk for developing colorectal cancer. After finding and removing precancerous polyps, repeat colonoscopy is routinely recommended. However, it is unclear whether repeat additional colonoscopy further reduces risk for colorectal cancer. For older adults age 75 and older, the lack of this information is especially important, given that the risks of colonoscopy go up with age. This research will evaluate whether older adults with a prior history of precancerous polyps have higher colorectal cancer risks compared to older adults who had a prior normal colonoscopy, and whether, among those with prior precancerous polyps, repeating a colonoscopy after age 75 is associated with reduced cancer risk. The investigators will synthesize these data and gather perspectives from Veterans and clinical stakeholders to make recommendations on whether older adults with a prior history of polyps should continue or defer colonoscopy after age 75.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • E7386 in Combination With Other Anticancer Drug in Participants With Solid Tumor

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the safety and tolerability and to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of E7386 in combination with other anticancer drug(s).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • NBF-006 in Non-Small Cell Lung, Pancreatic, or Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, non-controlled study conducted in two parts - Part A (dose escalation) followed by Part B (dose expansion).

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Colonoscopy Versus Fecal Immunochemical Test in Reducing Mortality From Colorectal Cancer (CONFIRM)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and one of the most preventable cancers. It has been shown in several randomized controlled trials that screening using fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) reduces CRC mortality by 13-33%. While there is strong consensus amongst experts regarding the value of CRC screening, the best approach to screening is not clear. Of the widely recommended modalities, FOBT and colonoscopy are the most commonly used within the United States. FOBT is inexpensive, non-invasive, and its use as a screening tool is supported by the highest quality evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials). Moreover, newer FOBT, such as fecal immunochemical tests or FITs, have advantages over conventional FOBT in terms of both test characteristics and ease of use that make them quite attractive as a population-based screening tool. While colonoscopy is invasive and has higher up-front risks and costs than FOBT, it does afford the opportunity to directly assess the colonic mucosa and is widely believed to be the best test to detect colorectal cancer. In addition, colonoscopy allows for the detection and removal of colorectal adenomas -a well recognized colorectal cancer precursor. There is indirect evidence that suggests colonoscopy is effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality, but to date, no large clinical trials have been completed to support this assumption. While colonoscopy use is increasing, data is emerging that colonoscopy may not be as effective as previously believed. Prior support for colonoscopy as a screening test relied upon effectiveness estimates that now appear to be overly optimistic. Given the invasive nature of colonoscopy, the associated small, but real risk of complications, and dramatically higher costs than other screening tests, it is especially important to determine the true comparative effectiveness of colonoscopy relative to other proven non-invasive options. The investigators propose to perform a, large, simple, multicenter, randomized, parallel group trial directly comparing screening colonoscopy with annual FIT screening in average risk individuals. The hypothesis is that colonoscopy will be superior to FIT in the prevention of colorectal cancer mortality measured over 10 years. Individuals will be enrolled if they are currently eligible for CRC screening (e.g. no colonoscopy in the past 10 years and no FOBT in the past 1 year) and are between 50 and 75 years of age. The investigators will exclude individuals for whom colonoscopy is indicated (e.g. signs or symptoms of CRC, first degree family member with CRC, personal history of colorectal neoplasia or inflammatory bowel disease). All participants will complete baseline demographic, medication, and lifestyle questionnaires (e.g. diet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, frequency of exercise) prior to randomization in a 1:1 ratio to either screening colonoscopy or annual FIT screening (Figure 1). Those testing positive by FIT will undergo evaluation to determine appropriateness for colonoscopy. Screening will be performed in a manner consistent with the currently accepted standard of care in order to determine the comparative effectiveness of the two screening strategies. Participants will be surveyed annually to determine if they have undergone colonoscopy or been diagnosed with CRC. The primary study endpoint will be CRC mortality within 10 years of enrollment. The secondary endpoints are (1) the incidence of CRC within 10 years of enrollment and (2) major complications of colonoscopy. Mortality will be determined through queries of the VA Vital Status File. Cause of death will be determined primarily using death certificates from the National Death Index-Plus database, augmented by adjudication of medical records for known CRC cases where CRC is not listed as a cause of death on the death certificate. The investigators postulate that screening colonoscopy will result in a 40% reduction in CRC mortality over 10 years relative to annual FIT screening. Using a log-rank test with a 2-sided test of significance, =0.05, a sample size of 50,000 participants will be required to test the primary hypothesis with 82% power, assuming a 1% annual rate of crossover from FIT to colonoscopy and a 0.5% annual rate of loss to follow-up. The planned study duration is 12.5 years with 2.5 years of recruitment and 10 years of follow-up for all enrolled participants.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • ColoRectal Cancer Screening for Southern California Community Health Centers

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can reduce cancer deaths. However, screening and abnormal test follow-up rates are low among underserved populations. The screening rates of 19-58%, and rates of colonoscopy completion after abnormal stool tests of 18-57% in community health centers (CHC) systems are low. This highlights an opportunity to improve early detection and decrease burden of CRC in our region. Mailed outreach and navigation programs have been shown to increase colonoscopy completion rate. The next step is to understand how to best implement these programs in the community on a larger scale. To achieve this goal, the investigators propose a Hub-and-Spoke intervention combining centralized strategies to maximize CRC screening, follow-up, and referral-to-care. The investigators hypothesize that this intervention will be superior to usual care for increasing CRC screening, abnormal test follow-up, and referral-to-care. The investigators will conduct a randomized trial to determine effectiveness in: 1) improvement in proportion of individuals up-to-date with screening 3 years post implementation; 2) proportion with abnormal FIT who complete diagnostic colonoscopy within 6 months; and 3) proportion with CRC completing first treatment evaluation. The investigators will also evaluate the implementation, scalability, and sustainability of the multi-level implementation strategy. The intervention consists of: Mailed FIT and Reminders. Eligible individuals will receive an introductory letter describing the importance of CRC screening and noting that follow-up mail will include a FIT Kit. It will also be offered to patients who completed prior mailed FIT with normal test results. All materials will be in English and Spanish. Two weeks later, participants will receive a packet via mail containing the FIT kit, a one-page invitation inviting FIT completion and FIT instructions, a postage-paid envelope for return to the patient's CHC, and COVID-19 message. For non-compliant individuals not returning the kit, a reminder phone call and text message will be delivered 2 weeks later. The investigators will track returned letters, individuals who are later found to be up-to date with screening, and those who decline screening. The CHC will provide care coordination for patients with an abnormal FIT result.

    La Jolla, California

  • Niraparib in the Treatment of Patients With Advanced PALB2 Mutated Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of niraparib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors and a pathogenic or likely pathogenic tumor PALB2 (tPALB2) mutation.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Stage II Colon Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone in treating colon cancer.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and/or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II MATCH screening and multi-sub-trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myelomas that may have spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). Patients must have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Active After Cancer Trial (AACT)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is being done to determine whether a telephone-based counseling intervention can help survivors of breast and colorectal cancer increase their weekly physical activity. Observational evidence suggests that physical activity after breast and colorectal cancer diagnosis decreases recurrence rates. Unfortunately, many people become less active during cancer therapy, and a substantial proportion never return to pre-diagnosis levels of physical activity. This study looks to see if people who have recently finished chemotherapy for breast, colon or rectal cancer can be motivated to increase their exercise by talking to an exercise specialist over the phone. The study also looks at changes in mood, fatigue, fitness, fat distribution and weight.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Tucatinib Combined With Trastuzumab and TAS-102 for the Treatment of HER2 Positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Molecularly Selected Patients, 3T Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase II trial studies whether tucatinib combined with trastuzumab and TAS-102 works to shrink tumors in patients with HER2 positive colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) and has one of the following gene mutations detected in blood: PIK3CA, KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF V600. Tucatinib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of the abnormal protein that signals tumor cells to multiply. This helps stop or slow the spread of tumor cells. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. TAS-102 is a combination of 2 drugs; trifluridine and tipiracil. Trifluridine is in a class of medications called thymidine-based nucleoside analogues. It works by stopping the growth of tumor cells. Tipiracil is in a class of medications called thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors. It works by slowing the breakdown of trifluridine by the body. Giving tucatinib, trastuzumab, and TAS-102 together may work better than usual treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Through Multiomics Blood Testing

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The PREEMPT CRC study is a prospective multi-center observational study to validate a blood-based test for the early detection of colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples from average-risk participants who will undergo a routine screening colonoscopy.

    San Diego, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Colorectal Tumor research studies include .

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