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Glioblastoma clinical trials at UCSD
7 in progress, 3 open to new patients

  • Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib Compared to Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cediranib maleate and olaparib work compared to bevacizumab in treating patients with glioblastoma that has come back. Cediranib maleate and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Study of Marizomib With Temozolomide and Radiotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is for newly diagnosed WHO Grade IV malignant glioma patients to determine whether an investigational drug known as marizomib (MRZ) will improve the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients by delaying the growth of the cancer, reducing the size of the tumor, and/or improving survival. Marizomib (MRZ) is being added to standard-of-care treatments of radiotherapy (RT), temozolomide (TMZ), and Optune.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • The Toca 5 Trial: Toca 511 & Toca FC Versus Standard of Care in Patients With Recurrent High Grade Glioma

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label phase 2/3 study of Toca 511 and Toca FC versus standard of care that comprises Investigator's choice of single agent chemotherapy (lomustine or temozolomide) or bevacizumab administered to subjects undergoing resection for first or second recurrence (including this recurrence) of GBM or AA. Subjects meeting all of the inclusion and none of the exclusion criteria will be randomized prior to surgery in a 1:1 ratio to receive either Toca 511 and Toca FC (Experimental arm, Arm T) or control treatment with one option of standard of care (Arm SOC). Stratification will be done by IDH1 mutation status. A second stratification factor is based on the patient's Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (70-80 vs 90-100). Further, to account for potential differences in treatment choices for the control arm in regions, the trial will be stratified by geographical region during the randomization process. Funding Source - FDA OOPD

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Dasatinib and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma or Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Bevacizumab may also block the growth of the tumor by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether bevacizumab together with dasatinib are more effective than a placebo in treating patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma or glioblastoma multiforme.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase I/II trial (Phase I completed) is studying the side effects and best dose of dasatinib when given together with bevacizumab and to see how well it works compared to placebo in treating patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma or glioblastoma multiforme.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Phase 3 Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Study of ICT-107 in Glioblastoma

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    ICT-107 consists of dendritic cells, prepared from autologous mononuclear cells that are pulsed with six synthetic peptides that were derived from tumor associated antigens (TAA) present on glioblastoma tumor cells. This is a Phase 3 study to evaluate ICT-107 in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Subjects will be randomized to receive standard of care chemoradiation (temozolomide (TMZ) with either ICT-107 or a blinded control. Reinfusion with the pulsed dendritic cells should stimulate cytotoxic T cells to specifically target glioblastoma tumour cells.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Study of a Drug [DCVax®-L] to Treat Newly Diagnosed GBM Brain Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary purpose of the study is to determine the efficacy of an investigational therapy called DCVax(R)-L in patients with newly diagnosed GBM for whom surgery is indicated. Patients must enter screening at a participating site prior to surgical resection of the tumor. Patients will receive the standard of care, including radiation and Temodar therapy and two out of three will additionally receive DCVax-L, with the remaining one third receiving a placebo. Patients randomized to the placebo arm will have the option to receive DCVax-L in a crossover arm upon documented disease progression. (note: DCVax-L when used for patients with brain cancer is sometimes also referred to as DCVax-Brain)

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Temozolomide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well temozolomide and veliparib work compared to temozolomide alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether temozolomide is more effective with or without veliparib in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    La Jolla, California and other locations