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Depression clinical trials at UCSD

10 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Collaborative Care for Women Veterans

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    Implementation of Tailored Collaborative Care for Women Veterans (CCWV) is designed to enhance primary care-mental health integration for women Veterans, by tailoring services to women Veterans' and providers' needs and providing an evidence-based intervention, Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management, to address anxiety and depression in a patient-centered approach. CCWV will be implemented in four of the Women's Health Practice-Based Research Network sites, with careful attention to local tailoring and adaptation to enhance the fit of the care model in varied local contexts.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Mobile Web-based Behavioral Intervention for Improving Caregiver Well-being

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    Caregivers suffer great amounts of distress that significantly impacts their mental and physical well-being, yet caregivers' access to quality, evidence-based care is currently very limited. The public health significance of the proposed study is that our internet and mobile-based web intervention will (1) significantly reduce caregiver distress and improve caregivers' overall well-being, and (2) dramatically increase caregivers' access to high quality, evidence-based care at relatively low cost.

    La Jolla, California

  • rTMS in Alleviating Pain and Co-Morbid Symptoms in Gulf War Veterans Illness (GWVI)

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This study aims to look at the effectiveness of using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in relieving pain and other co-morbid symptoms of Gulf War Illness.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • The Safety and Efficacy of Psilocybin in Participants With Treatment Resistant Depression

    open to eligible people ages 18-54

    The Safety and Efficacy of Psilocybin in Participants with Treatment Resistant Depression

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • A Study of Seltorexant Compared to Quetiapine XR as Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressants in Adult and Elderly Participants With Major Depressive Disorder With Insomnia Symptoms Who Have Responded Inadequately to Antidepressant Therapy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of seltorexant compared with quetiapine extended-release (XR) as adjunctive therapy to an antidepressant drug in treatment response in participants with major depressive disorder with insomnia symptoms (MDDIS) who have had an inadequate response to current antidepressant therapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI).

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Adapting and Examining Collaborative Decision Skills Training Among Veterans With Serious Mental Illness

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Recovery-oriented care is an imperative for the VA, particularly in mental health programming for Veterans with serious mental illness (SMI). Collaborative decision-making (CDM) is a recovery-oriented approach to treatment decision-making that assigns equal participation and obligation to patients and providers across all aspects of decision-making, thereby empowering patients and facilitating better decision-making based on patient values and preferences. CDM is associated with several important outcomes including improved treatment engagement, treatment satisfaction, and social functioning. However, current levels of CDM among Veterans with SMI are low, and there is not yet an evidence-based method to improve CDM. Improving Veteran skill sets associated with engaging in CDM is a potential intervention strategy. Collaborative Decision Skills Training (CDST) is a promising new intervention that was previously developed by the applicant for use in adult civilians with SMI and found to improve relevant skills and improve sense of personal recovery. The proposed study has two primary stages. First, a small, one-armed, open label trial will establish CDST's feasibility will evaluate CDST among 12 Veterans with SMI receiving services at the VA San Diego Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center (PRRC) and identify and complete any needed adaptations to CDST. Stakeholder feedback from Veterans, VA clinicians, and VA administrators will be collected to assess Veteran needs and service context to identify any needed adaptations to the CDST manual or the delivery of CDST to maximize its impact and feasibility. The developers of CDST will review all feedback and make final decisions about adaptations to ensure that CDST retains its essential components to protect against loss of efficacy. For example, a recommendation to adjust role-play topics to better reflect the needs of Veterans would be accepted because it would increase CDST's relevance without impairing its integrity, but a recommendation to remove all role-plays would not be accepted because it would cause loss of a key component. Second, CDST will be compared to active control (AC) using a randomized clinical trial of 72 Veterans. The primary outcome measure will be functioning within the rehabilitation context, operationalized as frequency of Veteran CDM behaviors during Veteran-provider interactions. Secondary outcomes are treatment attendance, engagement, satisfaction, and motivation, along with treatment outcomes (i.e., rehabilitation goal attainment, sense of personal recovery, symptom severity, and social functioning). Three exploratory outcomes will be assessed: Veteran-initiated collaborative behaviors, acute service use and provider attitudes and behavior. Veterans will be randomly assigned to CDST or AC conditions. Veterans in the both groups will attend eight hour-long group sessions held over eight weeks. All Veterans will complete an assessment battery at baseline, post-intervention, and at three-month post-intervention follow-up. Following the trial and adaptation phase, the findings will be used to develop a CDST service delivery manual and design a logical subsequent study. The results of the proposed study will inform the potential for larger trials of CDST and the utility of providing CDST broadly to Veterans with SMI. The results of this study will expand current understanding of CDM among Veterans with SMI by providing data that will: 1) identify adaptations needed to optimize CDST for Veterans receiving services in PRRCs; 2) identify possible benefits of CDST; 3) inform development of alternate interventions or methods to improve CDM; and 4) further elucidate CDM and associated treatment processes among Veterans with SMI receiving VA rehabilitation services.

    San Diego, California

  • Effectiveness and Implementation of eScreening in Post 9/11 Transition Programs

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Electronic screening is effective for timely detection of, and intervention for, suicidal ideation and other mental health symptoms. The VA eScreening program is a patient self-report electronic screening system that has shown promise for the efficient and effective collection of mental and physical health information among Veterans. However, additional effectiveness and implementation research is warranted to evaluate the impact of eScreening within VHA. This study will address questions of the impact of eScreening compared to screening as usual, while evaluating a multi-component implementation strategy (MCIS) for optimal enterprise rollout of eScreening in VA Transition Care Management clinics.

    San Diego, California

  • FASTLANE II: Reducing Sex, Drug, and Mental Health Risk

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The study uses a repeated measures, single group pretest-posttest design methodology to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of the FASTLANE II intervention aimed at decreasing risky sex behaviors among active methamphetamine using women. The study's methodology consists of two phases: 1) The feasibility and evaluation of recruitment capability and intervention effectiveness, and 2) qualitative acceptability interviews.

  • Latent Structure of Multi-level Assessments and Predictors of Outcomes for Women in Recovery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this study the investigators will seek to improve their understanding of how positive and negative valence systems, cognition, and arousal/interoception are inter-related in disorders of trauma, mood, substance use, and eating behavior for women involved in a court diversion program in Tulsa, Oklahoma (Women in Recovery). The investigators will recruit 100 individuals and use a wide range of assessment tools, neuroimaging measures, blood and microbiome collections and behavioral tasks to complete the baseline and follow-up study visits. Upon completion, the investigators aim to have robust and reliable dimensional measures that quantify these systems and a set of assessments that should be recommended as a clinical tool to enhance outcome prediction for the clinician and assist in determining who will likely benefit from the diversion program, and to inform future revision or augmentation of the program to increase treatment effectiveness.

  • SMART-DAPPER: Leveraging the Depression And Primary-care Partnership for Effectiveness-implementation Research Project

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Despite carrying the vast majority of the global mental disorder burden, 75% of adults with mental disorders in Low and Middle Income Countries have no access to services. This study will test strategies for integrating first and second line evidence-based depression and trauma-related disorder treatments with primary care services at a large public sector hospital and conduct robust cost and cost-benefit analyses of each treatment to produce a "menu" of cost-benefit options for personalized, integrated mental health care with corresponding effectiveness and implementation values.

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