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Glioma clinical trials at UCSD
12 in progress, 8 open to new patients

  • A Trial of Poly-ICLC in the Management of Recurrent Pediatric Low Grade Gliomas

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This study is for patients up to 21 years of age who have a tumor called a low grade glioma of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). The tumor has grown despite attempts to control it with chemotherapy or radiation. Low grade gliomas are a group of tumors that tend to grow slowly and could be cured if every bit of the tumor were surgically removed. These tumors are called Grade I or II astrocytomas. These tumors often grow in parts of the brain that prevent total removal without devastating neurologic complications or death. Although some low grade gliomas never grow, most will and are treated with either chemotherapy or radiation. There is good data showing that the growth of most low grade gliomas can be controlled with chemotherapy or radiation. However, some low grade gliomas in children and young adults grow despite these treatments. Poly-ICLC is a new drug that has been used safely in children and adults with different types of brain tumors. Earlier studies showed that this drug worked better for children and young adults with low grade gliomas than for children with more aggressive brain tumors. The main purpose of this study is to use Poly-ICLC treatment in a larger number of patients to see how well it works and how many side effects occur. As Poly-ICLC is not FDA approved, this study is authorized to use it under IND# 43984, held by Oncovir. Subjects will get injections of Poly-ICLC into muscle two times weekly. The first treatments will be given in the clinic so allergic or other severe reactions, if any, can be monitored. If subjects tolerate the injections and don't have a severe reaction, then the rest of the injections will be given at home. Subjects/caregivers will be trained to give injections. Treatment will last for about 2 years. Subjects may stay on treatment for longer than 2 years if their tumor shrinks in response to the injections, if study doctors think it is safe, if subjects want to remain on treatment, and if Poly-ICLC is available. Risks: Poly-ICLC has been used safely in children and adults at the dose used in this study, and at higher doses. Frequently seen side effects include irritation of the skin at the injection site and mild flu-like symptoms. These are usually relieved or avoided by use of over-the-counter medicines like acetaminophen (Tylenol). Funding Source: FDA OOPD

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx. 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma 9. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma. 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma 31. Adrenal cortical tumors 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • PNOC 001: Phase II Study of Everolimus for Recurrent or Progressive Low-grade Gliomas in Children

    open to eligible people ages 3-21

    This is an open label study of everolimus in children with recurrent or progressive low-grade glioma.

    San Diego, California and other locations

  • Radiation Therapy With Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide Versus Radiation Therapy With Adjuvant PCV Chemotherapy in Patients With Anaplastic Glioma or Low Grade Glioma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving radiation with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiation with adjuvant PCV is more effective in treating anaplastic glioma or low grade glioma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Study of Marizomib With Temozolomide and Radiotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is for newly diagnosed WHO Grade IV malignant glioma patients to determine whether an investigational drug known as marizomib (MRZ) will improve the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients by delaying the growth of the cancer, reducing the size of the tumor, and/or improving survival. Marizomib (MRZ) is being added to standard-of-care treatments of radiotherapy (RT), temozolomide (TMZ), and Optune.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Study of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor (PDGFR) in Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine the survival, disease response, and side effects of Tasigna® (nilotinib) in patients who have malignant gliomas and are positive for Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor (PDGFR) amplification. This study is designed to test the hypothesis that patients with malignant gliomas with PDGFR amplification are sensitive to PDGFR kinase inhibitors.

    La Jolla, California

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • The Toca 5 Trial: Toca 511 & Toca FC Versus Standard of Care in Patients With Recurrent High Grade Glioma

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label phase 2/3 study of Toca 511 and Toca FC versus standard of care that comprises Investigator's choice of single agent chemotherapy (lomustine or temozolomide) or bevacizumab administered to subjects undergoing resection for first or second recurrence (including this recurrence) of GBM or AA. Subjects meeting all of the inclusion and none of the exclusion criteria will be randomized prior to surgery in a 1:1 ratio to receive either Toca 511 and Toca FC (Experimental arm, Arm T) or control treatment with one option of standard of care (Arm SOC). Stratification will be done by IDH1 mutation status. A second stratification factor is based on the patient's Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (70-80 vs 90-100). Further, to account for potential differences in treatment choices for the control arm in regions, the trial will be stratified by geographical region during the randomization process. Funding Source - FDA OOPD

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Armodafinil in Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With High Grade Glioma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase III trial studies armodafinil to see how well it works in reducing cancer-related fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. Armodafinil may help relieve fatigue in patients with high grade glioma.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Dasatinib and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma or Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Bevacizumab may also block the growth of the tumor by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether bevacizumab together with dasatinib are more effective than a placebo in treating patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma or glioblastoma multiforme.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase I/II trial (Phase I completed) is studying the side effects and best dose of dasatinib when given together with bevacizumab and to see how well it works compared to placebo in treating patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma or glioblastoma multiforme.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Study of Cabiralizumab in Combination With Nivolumab in Patients With Selected Advanced Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a phase 1a/b single-arm, open-label study to evaluate safety, tolerability, PK, and clinical benefit of Cabiralizumab in combination with nivolumab in patients with selected advanced cancers.

    La Jolla, California and other locations

  • Temozolomide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well temozolomide and veliparib work compared to temozolomide alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether temozolomide is more effective with or without veliparib in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    La Jolla, California and other locations